Ask me anything   Born 1992 male. just here to blog my thoughts and ideas through the cyber world in hopes to spread ideas and gain new ones. Texas born city built. Strong believer in peace and helping humanity survive and thrive. German and Czech. Descent. iPhone boy.

rhamphotheca:

The Top 5 Times A Guest Debunked a FoxNews Host

Every once in a while, the truth sneaks through on Fox.

For more, visit: http://mediamatters.org

(via whallop)

— 6 hours ago with 23668 notes

ylatayaeray:

Macro photography of bees native to North America 

1: Beautiful Bee 2: A Golden Dusting 3: Drinking Straw Tongue 4: A Brilliant Blue 5: Jewel Tones 6: Honey Bee Head 7: Tiny Head Shot 8: Bumblebee

Source

(via whallop)

— 6 hours ago with 708 notes

Some of the most powerful pictures of all time

(Source: joshifers-love-child, via edariias)

— 7 hours ago with 129295 notes

strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 
like at all

strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 

like at all

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via lolsofunny)

— 1 day ago with 247613 notes

contemplatrium:

PEOPLE OF TUMBLR. PLEASE DEAR GOD LISTEN.
Nuclear power plants do NOT pollute the air. Do you see this picture? Those towers are cooling towers, which are used to cool down water for the nuclear power process. That steam coming out of the tower is clean, environmentally-friendly water vapor. It is not radioactive; it is not hazardous to the environment. In fact, a nuclear power plant produces ZERO harmful emissions during regular production. The only harmful byproduct of nuclear power plants is a small collection of used fuel cells that are replaced after every SIX YEARS of energy production. Six years in which that one reactor generated over TWO BILLION DOLLARS worth of clean energy production. And after the fuel cells are replaced, they are placed in contained storage, where they pose no threat to the environment. And, with the refinement of fusion power in the possible near future, even these harmless emissions will be completely eliminated.

So please, do us all a favor and stop being negligent about one of the best sources of clean energy in the world.

contemplatrium:

PEOPLE OF TUMBLR. PLEASE DEAR GOD LISTEN.
Nuclear power plants do NOT pollute the air. Do you see this picture? Those towers are cooling towers, which are used to cool down water for the nuclear power process. That steam coming out of the tower is clean, environmentally-friendly water vapor. It is not radioactive; it is not hazardous to the environment. In fact, a nuclear power plant produces ZERO harmful emissions during regular production. The only harmful byproduct of nuclear power plants is a small collection of used fuel cells that are replaced after every SIX YEARS of energy production. Six years in which that one reactor generated over TWO BILLION DOLLARS worth of clean energy production. And after the fuel cells are replaced, they are placed in contained storage, where they pose no threat to the environment. And, with the refinement of fusion power in the possible near future, even these harmless emissions will be completely eliminated.

So please, do us all a favor and stop being negligent about one of the best sources of clean energy in the world.

— 2 days ago with 476 notes

science-junkie:

NASA’s cold fusion tech could put a nuclear reactor in every home, car, and plane.When we think of nuclear power, there are usually just two options: fission and fusion. Fission, which creates huge amounts of heat by splitting larger atoms into smaller atoms, is what currently powers every nuclear reactor on Earth. Fusion is the opposite, creating vast amounts of energy by fusing atoms of hydrogen together, but we’re still many years away from large-scale, commercial fusion reactors.A nickel lattice soaking up hydrogen ions in a LENR reactorLENR is absolutely nothing like either fission or fusion. Where fission and fusion are underpinned by strong nuclear force, LENR harnesses power from weak nuclear force — but capturing this energy is difficult. So far, NASA’s best effort involves a nickel lattice and hydrogen ions. The hydrogen ions are sucked into the nickel lattice, and then the lattice is oscillated at a very high frequency (between 5 and 30 terahertz). This oscillation excites the nickel’s electrons, which are forced into the hydrogen ions (protons), forming slow-moving neutrons. The nickel immediately absorbs these neutrons, making it unstable. To regain its stability, the nickel strips a neutron of its electron so that it becomes a proton — a reaction that turns the nickel into copper and creates a lot of energy in the process.[…]So why don’t we have LENR reactors yet? Just like fusion, it is proving hard to build a LENR system that produces more energy than the energy required to begin the reaction. In this case, NASA says that the 5-30THz frequency required to oscillate the nickel lattice is hard to efficiently produce. As we’ve reported over the last couple of years, though, strong advances are being made in the generation and control of terahertz radiation. Other labs outside of NASA are working on cold fusion and LENR, too: “Several labs have blown up studying LENR and windows have melted,” says NASA scientist Dennis Bushnell, proving that “when the conditions are ‘right’ prodigious amounts of energy can be produced and released.”
Source: extremetech.com

science-junkie:

NASA’s cold fusion tech could put a nuclear reactor in every home, car, and plane.

When we think of nuclear power, there are usually just two options: fission and fusion. Fission, which creates huge amounts of heat by splitting larger atoms into smaller atoms, is what currently powers every nuclear reactor on Earth. Fusion is the opposite, creating vast amounts of energy by fusing atoms of hydrogen together, but we’re still many years away from large-scale, commercial fusion reactors.

A nickel lattice soaking up hydrogen ions in a LENR reactorLENR is absolutely nothing like either fission or fusion. Where fission and fusion are underpinned by strong nuclear force, LENR harnesses power from weak nuclear force — but capturing this energy is difficult. So far, NASA’s best effort involves a nickel lattice and hydrogen ions. The hydrogen ions are sucked into the nickel lattice, and then the lattice is oscillated at a very high frequency (between 5 and 30 terahertz). This oscillation excites the nickel’s electrons, which are forced into the hydrogen ions (protons), forming slow-moving neutrons. The nickel immediately absorbs these neutrons, making it unstable. To regain its stability, the nickel strips a neutron of its electron so that it becomes a proton — a reaction that turns the nickel into copper and creates a lot of energy in the process.[…]

So why don’t we have LENR reactors yet? Just like fusion, it is proving hard to build a LENR system that produces more energy than the energy required to begin the reaction. In this case, NASA says that the 5-30THz frequency required to oscillate the nickel lattice is hard to efficiently produce. As we’ve reported over the last couple of years, though, strong advances are being made in the generation and control of terahertz radiation. Other labs outside of NASA are working on cold fusion and LENR, too: “Several labs have blown up studying LENR and windows have melted,” says NASA scientist Dennis Bushnell, proving that “when the conditions are ‘right’ prodigious amounts of energy can be produced and released.”

Source: extremetech.com

— 2 days ago with 990 notes

transcendencemovie:

TRANSCENDENCE is now playing everywhere - get tickets now!

transcendencemovie:

TRANSCENDENCE is now playing everywhere - get tickets now!

— 2 days ago with 10392 notes

peechingtonmariejust:

Lmao I hate this website
LMAO

peechingtonmariejust:

Lmao I hate this website

LMAO

(Source: mrjynntastic, via lilbigmeech)

— 3 days ago with 5852 notes

popthirdworld:

Artists have placed a giant poster depicting a child’s face in an area of Pakistan where US drone attacks occur.  The project is called #NotABugSplat. This is in response to drone operators who refer to casualities as bug splats, cause from afar, viewed on monitors, that’s all the victims look like. The artists are hoping to have more artworks placed across Pakistan where drone strikes are frequent to help humanise victims to the strikers and the world.

popthirdworld:

Artists have placed a giant poster depicting a child’s face in an area of Pakistan where US drone attacks occur.  The project is called #NotABugSplat. This is in response to drone operators who refer to casualities as bug splats, cause from afar, viewed on monitors, that’s all the victims look like. The artists are hoping to have more artworks placed across Pakistan where drone strikes are frequent to help humanise victims to the strikers and the world.

(via agnosia)

— 3 days ago with 4250 notes

Are Focused Sound Waves Medicine’s Next Big Thing?

txchnologist:

by Michael Keller

The pictures on the left above show a patient with a benign bone tumor called an osteoid osteoma. The images on the right show the patient after doctors treated the tumor with focused ultrasound, a therapy that delivers high frequency sound waves inside the body without surgery.

Advocates for the technology say it is proving to be a useful and cost-effective treatment for a number of afflictions, from various cancers to neurological diseases.

“Focused ultrasound is increasingly being considered a game-changing technology,” said Kim Butts Pauly, a Stanford University professor of radiology. 

Read More

— 5 days ago with 125 notes